Decorative Trim

A welcoming home begins with the well-dressed walls. From the baseboards to casings, crown decorations to railings, trim is a design component that can add detail, richness and depth to the house. But it became very ordinary that a lot of home owners give too much importance on it.
Traditional homes can look great with a wide doorway, deep baseboards and window casings. Picture frame decorations, contoured and raised panels are suitable. Modern homes call for a simple molding with least shaping or detail. Elegant style homes are enhanced with very detailed attractive moldings.
Here are some trim and decoration elements that can enliven your house:

Decorative Trim Options

  • Base – used where the floor and the wall come together. The base hides the gaps between the wall and the floor finishes. It also provides a defense to the wall finish from jostled furniture and swinging feet. It is usually composed of three distinct parts. A shoe is the small beveled or curved piece that transitions from the board to the floor. The baseboard the tall and flat piece. The cap and decorative part sit on the baseboard. Bases now are more frequently not made of a one piece for a more contemporary and cleaner aesthetic.
  • Chair rail – moving up of the wall from the floor. This is the next trim after the base. This trim protects the wall finish from then furniture that puts on the wall. Though we install it usually 36 inches from the floor, a chair rail can be set up at any height. The main issue is how the chair rail will split in the horizontal layer to the wall and how it will do the proportions correctly.
  • Wainscot – while the space in the middle of the baseboard and the chair rail can be finished, commonly the area is paneled. There are many options for wainscot including beadboard, horizontal wood paneling, and simple wood panels and raised panels.
  • Window casing – the old-style method of window casing is using a separate bottom, side, and top pieces. Because every piece is different, the trim can be luxuriously articulated and detailed.
  • Door casing – like the window, they install the door traditionally as a separate piece but different from the casing of the window, door casing that does not have a bottom stool or apron.
  • Picture trail – this trim piece serves as a support to a hanging picture as the plaster wall were not the best and can be easily broken by the picture hangers nailed on the wall. People use this trim as an ornamental element in dividing the wall into the horizontal layers.
  • Plate rail – this trim piece functions as a display place to show a collection of objects. The depth of the plate rail may vary from very shallow to quite deep. The location of the plate rail on the wall will determine its distance.
  • Crown moulding– at the top of the wall is the crown molding, where the ceiling and the wall come together. Like the other trim pieces, the choice of size and profile are unlimited. What’s good about the crown molding is that it has the ability to unstiffen the transition between the ceiling and the wall.

These wall paneling ideas can enhance the look and value of the interior spaces in your house. If you’re looking for upgrades for any of the above, we are here to help you achieve your goals in a cost effective way. Raised wall paneling is our expertise and moulding is our passion. Call VIP Classic Moulding today to receive a free in-home consultation on your home improvement project.

We offer custom carpentry and trim work for homes, offices, commercial and more. All of our trim work includes standard trim carpentry such as; crown moulding, baseboards, columns, window casing, wainscoting, chair rails, cabinets, bookcases, interior doors, and any other custom architectural woodwork needed.

MDF Trim mouldings

Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF) is a manufactured wood product used in a variety of industries. The manufacturing process includes some chemicals which may be hazardous to humans, leading to concerns about the health risks of MDF. There are two primary health risks of MDF: exposure to the chemicals used to make it, and wood dust. By being aware of the potential health risks of MDF, people can protect themselves when they work with it.

MDF Trim mouldings are not a bad choice if you are on a budget and are fine for most homes. They will stand up well if the above suggestions for installation are followed. However, I am skeptical that a home with MDF mouldings will stand the test of time in the way that real wood moulding does and has been proven so. If you do use MDF mouldings throughout your home, I highly recommend using real wood finger jointed mouldings in areas with lots of moisture (MDF moulding in bathrooms just does not last).

Real wood moulding vs MDF

However, if your home is well made and high quality, I would suggest using real wood mouldings for stained and clear finishes. Real wood moulding or finger joint for painted finishes depending on your budget (solid real wood [not Finger Joint] if you can afford it).
By using real wood in your home, it adds value and will last and look good for as long as you decide to live in your home. Might be a good idea to take pictures during installation so if you ever decide to sell your home, you can prove and show the quality of materials used in your home.

Medium-density fiberboard (MDF) is generated from wood waste fibers that are glued together with resin and heat-pressed to form a composite. MDF is commonly used as trim molding because of its resistance to warping, density, smoothness, uniformity and ease of use and installation image alt tag=”MDF trim adds architectural interest to interior spaces as baseboards, casings and moldings.”

Because of pre-priming, MDF trim work requires little surface work for finishing. The composite wood product, which sells with or without veneer wrapping, costs less than other paint-grade wood moldings and is manufactured in lengths up to 16 feet and as jambs in door-height lengths. A consistent and smooth surface without knots or grains makes MDF trim easy to cut and paint.

More about MDF trim

MDF trim adds architectural detailing and finds usage in applications such as baseboards, crown molding, wainscoting and as window or door casings. Exterior applications include brick molding, column, door and window trims, gable vents and soffit trim.

Home builders and carpenters employ yellow woodworker’s glue, production screws, sheet-metal screws, coated staples, ring shank nails and spiral-grooved dowels when working with MDF trim. Screws are fastened by hand into pre-drilled holes or applied using a pneumatic nail gun with an air pressure from 98 to 100 PSI.

Cutting and sanding MDF trim can release urea formaldehyde, which irritate the eyes and nose and cause coughing and allergy reactions. Consider using dust masks and goggles for protection. Also, make sure a dust collection system is in place.